’Melt in the body’ electronics devised
2012-09-27 0:00

By James Gallagher | BBCNews



Ultra-thin electronics that dissolve inside the body have been devised by scientists in the US and could be used for a range of medical roles.

The devices can "melt away" once their job is done, according to research published in the journal Science.

The technology has already been used to heat a wound to keep it free from infection by bacteria.

The components are made of silicon and magnesium oxide, and placed in a protective layer of silk.


The device dissolves when it comes into contact with water


It is part of a field termed "transient electronics" and comes from researchers who have already developed "electronic tattoos" - sensors that bend and stretch with the skin.

They described their vanishing devices as the "polar opposite" of traditional electronics, which are built to be stable and to last.

Getting the electronics to fade away in a controlled manner relies on two scientific developments - getting the electronics to dissolve at all and using a shell to control when that happens.

Silicon dissolves in water anyway. The problem is that the size of components in conventional electronics means it would take an eternity. The researchers used incredibly thin sheets of silicon, called a nanomembrane, which can dissolve in days or weeks.

The speed of melting is controlled by silk. The material is collected from silkworms, dissolved and then allowed to reform. Altering the way the dissolved silk crystallises changes its final properties - and how long the device will last.

[...]

John Rogers, a mechanical science and engineering professor at the University of Illinois, said: "It’s a new concept, so there are lots of opportunities, many of which we probably have not even identified yet."

He told the BBC one likely use would be in wounds after surgery.

"Infection is a leading cause of readmission, a device could be put in to the body at the site of surgery just before it is closed up," he said.

"But you would only need it for the most critical period around two weeks after surgery."

The team of researchers have tested on rats a device that heats a wound to kill off bugs.

Read the full article at: bbc.co.uk













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