Poltergeists: Teen Angst & Telekinesis
2012 11 16

By Andrew Nicholson | MysteriousUniverse.org



Is poltergeist activity, those unexplained noisy bangings and rappings on walls and inanimate objects like furniture, toys and stones flying through the air, levitating or materialising from nowhere, the result of troublesome ghosts or evil spirits?

Or, does it have more to do with the pent-up psychic energy of lovelorn, rebellious and frustrated teens with hormones coursing through their veins and manifesting in the form of telekinesis. Three Australian cases of poltergeist activity appear to support the view that rather than troublesome ghosts and evil spirits, it may be more a case of teen angst and telekinesis.

The Guyra Ghost is arguably Australia’s most famous case of poltergeist activity, and appears to be the first Australian case in which the term poltergeist was actually used to describe the phenomena.

It all began in a small weatherboard cottage in April 1921 when the Bowen family of Guyra suddenly began experiencing “tremendous thumpings” on the walls of their home. Soon after the thumping sounds began, the Bowens were subjected to destructive showers of stones. Upon investigation, the Bowens found there to be “no human agency” involved in the wall banging and stone throwing.

As the unexplained activity continued, it soon became clear to the Bowens that their young daughter, Minnie, appeared to be the target of the supernatural happenings. Wherever Minnie went within the house, the “tremendous thumpings” accompanied her. Stones would crash through her bedroom window, landing on her bed.

In a Sydney Morning Herald article about the Guyra Ghost written in 1954, young Minnie was described in rather unflattering terms as “a thin, dark, little girl with an impassive face” and academically as “not very clever” and that she was “backward for her age at school”.

With the Bowens becoming increasingly desperate, and the stone trowing becoming increasingly destructive, they soon called on their neighbours for help. The locals quickly came to the family’s defence.

“Night after night, the men of the township threw a double cordon round the cottage. Night after night, the stone-throwing and the thunderous rapping on the walls continued,” reported the Sydney Morning Herald.

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