Hugo Chavez: Marxist Money Power Stooge
2013-03-28 0:00

by Anthony Migchels | henrymakow.com


During his reign, the number of private sector jobs declined by an astonishing 30%. Half of Venezuelans depend on the informal economy to survive. Public payrolls have ballooned.

Hugo Chávez’s fierce resistance to US Imperialism was much appreciated but his domestic policies were openly Marxist. His most notable legacy is the Bolivarian Alliance for the Americas, dedicated at social, economic and political integration of Latin America. In short: he was a globalist. Different a-hole. Same shit.

Was Chávez also a Mason? There’s this Masonic handshake with Obama.




His model, Simon Bolivar, definitely was. Bolivar led the rise against Spanish rule in northern Latin America in the early 1800′s. His Masonic watchword was ’liberty’, fitting well with that Masonic construct known as the United States, which only a few decades earlier gained ’independence’ from the City.

Bolivar became the president of a country named Gran Colombia which existed between 1819 and 1830. After gaining independence from Spain, the country succumbed to a power struggle between those wanting a strong centralized state and those looking for regional autonomy in a federation. Bolivar led the quest for centralization of power, an eternal tell tale of the real enemy. In 1830 Gran Colombia ceased to exist: the conflict ended when it became a number of smaller entities: Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador. Later Panama seceded from Colombia.

One of the bankers more memorable, yet unknown defeats. It certainly didn’t damage the reputation of their man Bolivar and that is probably not a coincidence. Money Power defeats are not part of the history they write, lest they might inspire others.

The Bolivarian Agenda

Chávez made the reliving of the Bolivarian dream a key part of his agenda. It was Chávez’ answer to the failed US driven ’Free Trade Area of the Americas’.

He financed FARC, a ridiculous outfit run by coke-dealers parading as Marxist champions of the people. Chávez called for a ’socialism of the 21st century’. He denounced the Soviet Union as State Capitalism, which is a very apt description. But his own politics were similar in many respects. He created thousands of ’communal councils’ throughout the country. In Russian, these are ’soviets’. They are touted as wonderful examples of ’participatory democracy’, but are actually run from the top down.

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Chavez started tens of thousands of state-owned cooperatives, financed with government credit. As a result, the private sector tanked. During his reign the number of private sector jobs declined with an astonishing 30%. Half of Venezuelans depend on the informal economy to survive. Public payrolls have ballooned.



Venezuela enjoyed an unprecedented oil-boom under Chávez and he used some of this money to alleviate the plight of the poor. Housing was a top priority; health spending also rose significantly, from 1.6% of GDP in 2000 to 7.7% in 2006. These are his main achievements. But an oil boom will end and it remains to be seen whether the welfare state is sustainable with such a severely mauled private sector.

(It’s not the Rothschilds! It’s the evil Americans.)



Banking

Chávez did absolutely nothing about the real issue: banking, debt and usury. The Venezuelan Central bank is State owned, as in most nation, except the US. But State-owned means providing State sanction to private banks to loot economy with their usury.

Its banks are private; many are run by his pals. A few years ago, some were nationalized during a crisis. Venezuelans were on the hook for their ’balances’, better called black holes. Chavez actually arrested a handful of bankers. But most were left to continue their plunder unscathed.

While he wisely paid off all debt to the IMF and the World Bank in 2008, public debt itself rose from $1400 per capita in 2002 to $3400 in 2010. During this time, the Bolivar lost 90% of its value. Meanwhile, he subsidized the transnationals repatriating their profits. In addition, he fixed the Bolívar-Dollar exchange rate at only one third of the Dollar’s real value, an incredible subsidy for Transnationals repatriating their profits and the wealthy importing luxury goods. The poor paid for this subsidy and it cost them untold billions
In short: while redistributing wealth from the middle classes to the poor through taxation, monetary slavery ruled supreme during his reign.

Many Venuzuelans will never forget Hugo Chávez. He helped emancipate the poorest. He scolded the Empire.

But his legacy is built on quicksand. He did nothing to address the root cause of poverty. All he did was destroy the private sector and the middle classes by switching from a private economy to a State-run one. The wealthy had nothing to fear and much to gain under his rule. Meanwhile he furthered the Internationalist agenda by laying the foundation for Latin American ’cooperation’.

It’s difficult for many to see that the evil US Empire is ’opposed’ by forces no less evil forces. Be it the Russian, Chinese or whatever leadership.
Hugo Chávez was one of them.

Read the rest: henrymakow.com



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