Cancer cells are dormant during chemotherapy
2012 12 17

By Lia Grainger | Yahoo.com



A team of Toronto cancer researchers have made a breakthrough they say will change the way cancer is studied and even treated.

The team, led by stem cell scientist John Dick of The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, has discovered that some cancer cells are able to hide from chemotherapy because they are "dormant", only to reactivate at a later time after chemo to cause a recurrence of the disease.

Dick suggests future treatments might involve targeting these dormant cells to become active before chemotherapy, so that they cannot hide from the treatment. One possibility is that changing the location of these cells could activate them and make them susceptible to chemotherapy.

"I suspect that their dormancy also has to do with the environment they are in," says Dick.

He explains that within a tumour, there are a wide range of cells, including ones that are not cancerous, like blood vessels that provide oxygen and allow for cell growth. It’s possible that cancer cells that are not near these types of life-sustaining cells may become dormant, and by moving them, they will become active.

All of these ideas are sure to be the subjects of future investigation.

Perhaps the most surprising finding for Dick and his team is that these dormant cells are genetically identical to the cells that had caused the original cancer.

"These cells share the same genetics, but vary widely in chemotherapy resistance," says Dick. "We stumbled onto something that is a paradox shift in the field."


[...]


Read the full article at: yahoo.com






Tune into Red Ice Radio:

Rick Simpson - Hemp Oil Cancer Cure

Dr. Andrew Saul - The War on Vitamins & Nutrition

David Crowe - Rethinking AIDS

Scott Tips - National Health Federation & Codex Alimentarius

Sabina DeVita - Electromagnetic Pollution, The Silent Invisible Pollutant







Related Articles
Orangutan has world-first chemo treatment
Why chemotherapy doesn’t work - Cancer tumors confirmed to have stem cells that regenerate tumors
Cancer research aimed to save patients from chemo
Study Accidentally Finds Chemotherapy Makes Cancer Far Worse
In breakthrough, patients’ immune systems attack cancer cells
Magnets kill cancer cells in lab


Latest News from our Front Page

Fukushima radiation killing children, government hiding the truth
2014 04 22
Katsutaka Idogawa, former mayor of Futaba, a town near the disabled Fukushima nuclear plant, is warning his country that radiation contamination is affecting Japan’s greatest treasure - its children. Asked about government plans to relocate the people of Fatuba to the city of Iwaki, inside the Fukushima prefecture, Idogawa criticized the move as a "violation of human rights." Compared with Chernobyl, radiation ...
Why your fingerprints may not be unique
2014 04 22
Assumption that everyone has a unique fingerprint from which they can be identified through a computer database is flawed, says Home Office expert Mike Silverman Fingerprint evidence linking criminals to crime scenes has played a fundamental role in convictions in Britain since the first forensic laboratory was set up in Scotland Yard in 1901. But the basic assumption that everyone has a ...
Asteroids cause dozens of nuclear-scale blasts in Earth’s atmosphere
2014 04 22
Asteroids caused 26 nuclear-scale explosions in the Earth’s atmosphere between 2000 and 2013, a new report reveals. Some were more powerful – in one case, dozens of times stronger – than the atom bomb blast that destroyed Hiroshima in 1945 with an energy yield equivalent to 16 kilotons of TNT. Most occurred too high in the atmosphere to cause any serious damage ...
‘Editing DNA’ to eliminate genetic conditions now a reality
2014 04 22
Scientists have employed a revolutionary genome-editing computer technique that accurately identifies one faulty genetic “letter” among billions and effortlessly repairs a genetic condition in animals, paving way for human trials. The success, by MIT in Boston, is the latest achievement in the field of genome editing that has been catapulted into the spotlight through a technology that can pinpoint genetic faults ...
EU should ’undermine national homogeneity’ says UN migration chief
2014 04 22
The EU should "do its best to undermine" the "homogeneity" of its member states, the UN’s special representative for migration has said. Peter Sutherland told peers the future prosperity of many EU states depended on them becoming multicultural. He also suggested the UK government’s immigration policy had no basis in international law. He was being quizzed by the Lords EU home affairs sub-committee ...
More News »